Go Back   Al's Place Quantum Leap Online Community >
Main Quantum Leap Discussions
> Episode Guide Ratings and Reviews > Quantum Leap: Season Three

View Poll Results: Nuclear Family
Excellent 6 19.35%
Good 16 51.61%
Average 9 29.03%
Fair 0 0%
Poor 0 0%
Voters: 31. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-12-2008, 07:08 PM   #26
Snish
Observer's Aid
 
Snish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Cocono's in the Poconos
Posts: 642
Default

Wow, it's interesting to hear from someone who remembers that incident--especially as a parent, not a child. (I wasn't even born yet.) I'm sure the episode wasn't that realistic, but it does make a point about how easy it is for people to let themselves get out of control because of fear.
__________________
Snish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2008, 09:12 PM   #27
ohboy
Junior Leaper
 
ohboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 1,383
Default

I know that this is much easier to say now that the Cuban Missle Crises is over, but I did think the commercial where the people ducked under the picnic blanket was very funny. I mean, what would the picnic blanket do?

I know that there wasn't anything else to do, and I'm aware that this would have provided false hope for the people, but if one actually plays the scenerio of crawling under a picnic blanket in their head as an atom bomb goes off, then one may see the humor in that. The funniest part had to be how calm the announcer was as the family ducked, when he said "this family knows what to do. Your family should as well."

I would like to once again state that it is only funny now because the threat is gone. IN a time of fear, that would have appeared much more logical.
__________________
"Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by doing some have unwittingly entertained angels."
Dr. Wily is a registered trademark of Capcom, and I don't own the rights to it in anyway, nor do I profit from the avatar.
ohboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2008, 08:08 PM   #28
MO
Pulse Communications Technician
 
MO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: In a tin can in the countryside
Posts: 310
Default

Cowering under a picnic blanket during an atomic detonation gives people the feeling that they have control in a situation where they actually have no control. It is a psychological tool to help alleviate panic. Essentially, it's a feel-good thing.

I like to compare it to a midwife telling the husband of a woman in labor to go boil some water. He wants to help, but he's just in the way, so he is told to go boil the water. He runs off to boil water (which is completely pointless, but it takes a long time, and gets him out of the way), and thus he feels he's helping.

I have a funny story that my husband told me about something very similar that happened years ago, if you're interested.
__________________
"What's left after you go is the good you've left behind."
-- Robert Zubrin, American aerospace engineer
MO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2008, 09:51 PM   #29
ohboy
Junior Leaper
 
ohboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 1,383
Default

I always love to hear a good story. The funnier, the better!
__________________
"Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by doing some have unwittingly entertained angels."
Dr. Wily is a registered trademark of Capcom, and I don't own the rights to it in anyway, nor do I profit from the avatar.
ohboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 11:32 AM   #30
Lightning McQueenie
Junior Leaper
 
Lightning McQueenie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,007
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Beckett Fan View Post
Wow yikes, that definietly sounds difficult and that was a very scary time for Jews. The Holocaust I have much more second hand information on as we did whole units on World War II in more than one of my history classes. And we read Night in one of my english classes, tenth grade I think it was. Its a novel but its about a boy named Eli and his family during the Holocaust. And its a true story. Terrible things were done to those people.
Yes, a true story as told by Eli himself (with the help of an author). If I remember correctly, he had quite a large family, and he and one of his sisters were the only survivors. A brilliant novel, I still have nightmares about what I read (we read it in English class in Year 12, as if Year 12 isn't difficult and depressing enough, we get given this, "Stolen", which is a play about the Aboriginal Stolen Generations, and "One True Thing", which is a novel about a woman who has to move back in with her parents to look after her mother who is dying of cancer...)

Sort of getting back on topic... It really makes me wonder why the Jews would have just let those atrocities happen to themselves. It's obvious that some people had a fair idea what was happening (e.g. Eli only survived because he was given a tip by someone else on the train that took them to the camp, to say that he was 18, he was 14 at the time and would have been sent to the gas chamber if the Nazis knew). If people in the Jewish communities knew what was being planned, why didn't they try to escape? Why didn't they fight back? I remember seeing a movie, also a true story, I can't remember its name, but it had guy who is the newest James Bond (Daniel something) as the main character. He and his brothers saved entire Jewish communities by having them run from the ghettos and live in the woods, and at the same time create a resistance to fight off Nazis if they should come near. It's obvious that there were people trying to fight back - it just astounds me that so many just laid down and died...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicken Boo View Post
Cowering under a picnic blanket during an atomic detonation gives people the feeling that they have control in a situation where they actually have no control. It is a psychological tool to help alleviate panic. Essentially, it's a feel-good thing.

I like to compare it to a midwife telling the husband of a woman in labor to go boil some water. He wants to help, but he's just in the way, so he is told to go boil the water. He runs off to boil water (which is completely pointless, but it takes a long time, and gets him out of the way), and thus he feels he's helping.

I have a funny story that my husband told me about something very similar that happened years ago, if you're interested.
I too would love to hear this story, but since this post is 4 years old, I doubt we ever will :P
__________________
Lightning McQueenie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 04:09 PM   #31
JuliaM
Project Observer
 
JuliaM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 820
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning McQueenie View Post
If people in the Jewish communities knew what was being planned, why didn't they try to escape? Why didn't they fight back? I remember seeing a movie, also a true story, I can't remember its name, but it had guy who is the newest James Bond (Daniel something) as the main character. He and his brothers saved entire Jewish communities by having them run from the ghettos and live in the woods, and at the same time create a resistance to fight off Nazis if they should come near. It's obvious that there were people trying to fight back - it just astounds me that so many just laid down and died...
Wow...this just astounds me in its insensitivity. The Jewish people (and others) who were murdered under the Nazi regime during the Holocaust didn't just "lay down and die". Hitler's "Final Solution" (the planned execution of all European Jews) wasn't something that came about at the snap of a finger and wasn't widely publicized. It was part of a well-planned and well-orchestrated attempt at genocide that started with state sponsored racism and then grew worse and worse.

An excerpt from the Holocaust Museum's website that may help to explain some of what was happening:

Quote:
Under the rule of Adolf Hitler, the persecution and segregation of Jews was implemented in stages. After the Nazi party achieved power in Germany in 1933, its state-sponsored racism led to anti-Jewish legislation, economic boycotts, and the violence of the Kristallnacht("Night of Broken Glass") pogroms, all of which aimed to systematically isolate Jews from society and drive them out of the country.
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article....uleId=10005151

The "Final Solution" wasn't put into play until 1941. By that time the Jews were already in the concentration camps and forced labor camps. Many of them were too weak to even resist at that point. As they were being led to gas chambers, they were being told they were taken to communal showers.

For the most part, most of the world didn't even know about Hitler's "Final Solution" and as the Allied forces advanced, the Germans would try to hide evidence of the death camps.

As the Allied forces liberted the concentration camps and death camps and word of what the Nazis were doing reached the rest of the world, many couldn't believe that it was happening...that someone could hate another so badly as to try to wipe the very existence of a race from the planet...that is how atrocious what was happening was...it defied human nature.
__________________

Last edited by JuliaM; 01-31-2012 at 10:11 PM. Reason: corrected spelling and grammar
JuliaM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 05:23 PM   #32
asearcher
Observer's Aid
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 504
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmoniz View Post
... was something that came about at the snap of a finger and was widely publicized. It was part of a well-planned and well-orchestrated attempt at genocide that started with state sponsored racism and then grew worse and worse.
I think you meant 'wasn't something that came about...'

And yes, people did try to escape. Many did while they could (Albert Einstein was one.) And it wasn't always possible. You may wish to look up the S.S. St. Louis and what happened to to those people that tried but failed to escape.

Basically, Hitler's regime 'boiled the frog.' (Note: I'm not advocating doing this...it's just an illustrative story.) That is, if you put a frog in boiling water to start with, it will attempt to jump out. However, if you start the frog in cold water and slowly turn up the heat, it will not attempt to leave until it's too late. There were many quite reasonable people that could not conceive of what Hitler planned to do. Additionally, it wasn't just the Jewish people who suffered. Gypsy's, the disabled (physically and/or mentally), and pretty much anyone that didn't fit the 'perfect picture' of the Third Reich were systematically destroyed.

I definitely liked the way Sam handled his coming face to face with the woman and the fears that had become a permanent part of her psyche. What the people with those numbers endured was nothing short of pure unadulterated hell. I pray fervently that we never have a group that repeats those evils any where or any time.

As to the Cuban Missile Crisis, I did live through it as a child. I was about 5 years old and I remember both the TV special alerts and how people acted around me. My parents certainly didn't try to scare us but fear has a way of seeping out even when we think we're being bastions of serenity. I remember my brothers and I being much like the children on the show.

And yes...we saw the duck and cover films. Keep in mind that even in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, not everyone died even fairly close to ground zero. Many died within hours or days but some survived for years. The duck and cover scenario wouldn't have done much, but it may have helped a few people depending on the actual deployment of a bomb. Additionally, I've been at the Trinity bomb site and I saw how far the people who witnessed the detonation were which wasn't that far relatively speaking (a few miles) and all of them survived and many lived for years although there was a high rate of cancer deaths in the witnesses. There were towns not much further out (e.g. 30 miles) from the bomb that felt some effects but weren't destroyed or even seriously damaged. So, yeah, in the 1960's it was the best that could be done living in that insanity.

Also, there was a Twilight Zone episode that appeared in the 60's much closer to the threat. In it, a physician is having a birthday and all their friends (neighbors) are at the dinner. An alert comes across the air and the show is how all the neighbors react since the physician has a bomb shelter and none of the others do. The story has all sort of realities in it as the veneer of polite society disintegrates. I suggest you compare the two shows and perhaps some of Paul Brown's motivations could be seen. It's not an exact duplicate but some of the concepts are similar.

Oh..and as to the way Sam was treated, keep in mind this. Sam was being their uncle but all of the sudden he's not acting like their uncle always had in the past. Previously, the uncle probably agreed with his brother. Now, in the midst of all the crazyness that was affecting that community, he starts spouting what (as Bluedana pointed out) could be seen as treasonous words. He'd been going to college and many felt that many professors were secretly 'red.' So...his brother throwing his brother out could have been directly related to 'OMG...my brother's becoming one of them...' and as a father, he wants to protect his children from messages that were abysmal to him.

Anyways...that's how I see the show in various context's. Interesting thread.
__________________
asearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 05:46 PM   #33
JuliaM
Project Observer
 
JuliaM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 820
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by asearcher View Post
I think you meant 'wasn't something that came about...'
Good catch...I was typing too fast. I've since fixed it.
__________________
JuliaM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 02:36 AM   #34
Lightning McQueenie
Junior Leaper
 
Lightning McQueenie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,007
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmoniz View Post
Wow...this just astounds me in its insensitivity.
Sorry, that was a poor choice of words...

Quote:
The Jewish people (and others) who were murdered under the Nazi regime during the Holocaust didn't just "lay down and die". Hitler's "Final Solution" (the planned execution of all European Jews) wasn't something that came about at the snap of a finger and wasn't widely publicized. It was part of a well-planned and well-orchestrated attempt at genocide that started with state sponsored racism and then grew worse and worse.

An excerpt from the Holocaust Museum's website that may help to explain some of what was happening:

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article....uleId=10005151

The "Final Solution" wasn't put into play until 1941. By that time the Jews were already in the concentration camps and forced labor camps. Many of them were too weak to even resist at that point. As they were being led to gas chambers, they were being told they were taken to communal showers.

For the most part, most of the world didn't even know about Hitler's "Final Solution" and as the Allied forces advanced, the Germans would try to hide evidence of the death camps.

As the Allied forces liberted the concentration camps and death camps and word of what the Nazis were doing reached the rest of the world, many couldn't believe that it was happening...that someone could hate another so badly as to try to wipe the very existence of a race from the planet...that is how atrocious what was happening was...it defied human nature.
Again, I should have chosen my words more carefully. I knew that the Final Solution was a step in plans that had been taking place for years. It just made me wonder why they allowed the anti-Jewish legislation to be passed which, to use your metaphor, "started the water boiling". And it makes me wonder why there wasn't more of a protest...
__________________
Lightning McQueenie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 01:28 PM   #35
asearcher
Observer's Aid
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 504
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning McQueenie View Post
It just made me wonder why they allowed the anti-Jewish legislation to be passed which, to use your metaphor, "started the water boiling". And it makes me wonder why there wasn't more of a protest...
You must understand that as large of a Jewish population there was in Germany at that time, they weren't the majority. Added to that, that particular population had faced anti-semitism for centuries in a variety of countries (including Germany.) Look up pogram, the Spanish Inquisition, and historical forms of anti-Semitic actions. Add to that the at that point in time, protests were usually soundly trounced (e.g. Occupy Wall Street or 60's type protests would have been summarily ended by the police.) Thus, a combination of 'this too shall pass' and an inability to actually protest meant there were not the type of protests you are seeking in history.

Yes, a lot of people left when this started. However, more got caught up the situation never believing that what eventually happened could ever happen.

If you really want to know the answer to your question, why don't you study more about this time in history from reputable sources. There are many books and other resources out there. A mix of media's provides the fullest picture. The biggest thing to understand, though, is these people did not just act like lemmings and 'allow themselves to be killed."

P.S. Here's a good start: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History...ews_in_Germany

2nd P.S.: In regard to the episode, my husband was in his mid-teens during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He says that he felt the portrayal of what was happening during that time was incredibly accurate. You may argue why Paul Brown wrote it the way he did, but from people who actually lived through that specific time, it looks like he did a pretty good job.
__________________

Last edited by asearcher; 02-01-2012 at 02:19 PM.
asearcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 11:24 PM   #36
RossBeckett
Project Observer
 
RossBeckett's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Near Cincinnati, OH (Zipcode 45039)
Posts: 735
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alsplacebartender View Post

Southern Florida (200 miles north of Cuba)
City of Homestead, Florida to be more precise.
__________________
"If you want her to cook the meal, you gotta let her shop for the groceries."
Wilson White; Chairman of the Board of Directors of Tunney Media Group*(TMG). (Ed Asner; Studio 60 On The Sunset Strip)


*TMG is the fictional conglomerate corporation that owns the fictional National Broadcasting System(NBS) and both were created by Aaron Sorkin("The West Wing", "A Few Good Men")
RossBeckett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2013, 02:18 PM   #37
iMonrey
Waiting Room Visitor
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 36
Default

I think this episode perfectly encapsulated what Quantum Leap was all about - really capturing a specific era or period in history and showing what it was like to live back then. In fact I'm hard-pressed to think of any other episode that so perfectly portrays a moment in time - maybe Leap Home Part II. So many episodes do a great job of telling stories about specific characters, but the time in history is too often secondary and even sometimes arbitrary.

Of course, to be fair, it would be impossible for this show to pinpoint as many moments in history as significant as the Cuban missile crisis, but this is one of only a handful of episodes that literally could not have taken place at any other time.

The panic at the end, when JFK comes on TV and suddenly the lights go out and the air raid sirens start, is palpable. You can really feel and believe why something like that would go down.
__________________
iMonrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2014, 04:12 AM   #38
Sam Beckett Fan
Senior Leaper
 
Sam Beckett Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 2,824
Default

I must say that I'm quite embarrassed by my older posts in this thread of all episodes, to the point where I refuse to even look at them.
Several of my posts here are in argument with JuliaM over the interactions between Sam and Mac which I sorely regret.

After watching this episode recently I've become utterly baffled at how it had once annoyed me.
It was a well portrayed take on an important historical event and one reason I may be able to appreciate that now is that I've come to enjoy history.

Despite how Sam preached that nothing would happen what he was probably too young to remember and Al even pointed this out is how that nothing had been excruciatingly close to being something. Which reminds me of Scott's line in his later film Blue Smoke (very good film) "Nearly doesn't count". Perhaps that's the view Sam had taken but he was nine years old at the time and did not live in Florida with a Cuban nuclear missile base in his backyard. So he was unable to understand how real it was for these people.

"Well, how come they're building a nuclear missile base not more
than 200 miles from our backyard?"


When the father says this the son Stevie then gets '200 miles' stuck in his head. A very generous rounding off due to panic, anger and possibly even some denial, literally it was 90 miles south of Florida and launched from that location they would have been able to very quickly reach targets in the eastern US. Unlike the Ellroys I am beginning to feel like the Becketts may not have exposed their children to all that news/information.

Remember, of course we do, the beginning of the season The Leap Home when Sam tried to reveal the future to his family?
We see him now doing that again only this time it was a family of strangers. I liked that. I liked that we got that perspective of the concept.
I'm reminded of episode 3 of the Star Wars prelude trilogy where we are shown quite powerfully through the birth of Darth Vader how future information can literally be destructive.
The words 'It will be ok" are so fragile as demonstrated by the older woman with the Holocaust tattoo.

"It's the words. 'It's going to be ok'. That's what they told us, and look what happened."

That was powerful. My favorite scene hands down.
So Sam pushed, the Ellroys pulled.

A really well done episode.
__________________

-=-=-=-=-
Icon made by the lovely Ladystoneheart with the beautiful screen captures of StrayStar.
Signature made by me.
My QL screen capture collection: http://s1366.photobucket.com/user/Sa...?sort=3&page=1

Last edited by Sam Beckett Fan; 06-25-2014 at 01:53 PM.
Sam Beckett Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2015, 05:15 AM   #39
Donofrio_QLTD
Control Room Technician
 
Donofrio_QLTD's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Mexico City (D.F.)
Posts: 135
Default

I wasn't sure whether to give this one only a "fair" score or not. But I analyzed it a bit more and realized that it was nobody's fault. It's one of the very few QL episodes that makes me pretty uncomfortable while watching it and one I always try to stay clear of... but for some reason I can't.

I didn't like any of the characters, of course. From the adults to the kids themselves, everyone was quite annoying in this episode. Those kids had to be the worst actors on the history of television (the little boy was in a Stephen King TV movie from 1991 called "Sometimes They Come Back" and he was terrible there as well). And everyone just kept making bad decisions and guiding themselves through their feelings and not using their heads at all. The only character I cared for was the old lady Sam was trying to sell the shelter to. She was quite compelling and I really felt for her...

But even with all this, it's nobody's fault. Meaning that in this case it's not even the writer, Paul Brown's fault. Normally, I always say that his characters are quite stereotyped and his situations are even worse, but in this case all his situations and his characters, as annoying and uncomfortable as they were, were quite real and believable and made you very concerned, if you were one of the lucky ones to not live through those times and in that country, the U.S.A., about what it was like during such crisis. It's one of the few chapters that almost doesn't have anything funny about it. In fact it only has one funny moment and that's at the beginning, but then everything is so hostile and serious and dark and it keeps getting worse and worse... and then it ends and you can't breathe deeply until he has finally leapt out and you know he won't ever see those people again.

As much as I hate this episode, I have to recognize that this is one of the best ones Paul Brown has ever written. It's just not of my taste. But all the last act, when the real action takes place, is my favorite part. Another thing I dug a lot from this one was that almost always P. Brown has a way of making Sam a bit naive about things, but here that was not the case: He was quite mature, centered and three-dimensional this time, something very rare indeed for a PB ep.

My rating: Average. It probably deserves more but it never leaves me with any good taste at all.
__________________
Donofrio_QLTD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2015, 07:31 PM   #40
Sam Beckett Fan
Senior Leaper
 
Sam Beckett Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 2,824
Default

Alright my apologies, I'd like to do some revamping of my last post but that damn edit window...I can't even delete it now!

I must say that I'm quite embarrassed by my older posts in this thread of all episodes, to the point where I refuse to even look at them.
Several of my posts here are in argument with JuliaM over the interactions between Sam and Mac which I sorely regret.

After watching this episode recently, it's come to my understanding that while it may come across as annoying for some there is no flaw in that as it was a well written and believable take on an important historical event. One reason I may be able to appreciate that now is that I've come to enjoy history.

Despite how Sam preached that nothing would happen what he was probably too young to remember and Al even pointed this out is how that 'nothing' had been excruciatingly close to being 'something'. Which reminds me of Scott's line in his later film Blue Smoke (very good film) "Nearly doesn't count". Perhaps that's the view Sam had taken and originally I'd thought the Ellroys cruel for subjecting their children to living in fear of dying but I was just as ignorant as I now see Sam as and now have a much stronger grasp on my own raw honesty than when I was younger. So can now appreciate the Ellroys for that.

Sam was nine years old at this time and did not live in Florida with a Cuban nuclear missile base in his backyard. So he was unable to understand how real it was for these people.

"Well, how come they're building a nuclear missile base not more
than 200 miles from our backyard?"


When the father says this the son then gets '200 miles' stuck in his head but that was a very generous rounding off due to panic, anger and possibly even some denial. Literally it was 90 miles south of Florida and launched from that location those missiles would have been able to very quickly reach targets in the eastern US. Unlike the Ellroys I am beginning to feel like the Becketts may not have exposed their children to all that news/information.

Remember, of course we do, the beginning of the season 'The Leap Home' when Sam tried to reveal the future to his family? I like that we are seeing that again now but with a family of strangers. That made for a very intriguing perspective of the concept.

I'm reminded of episode 3 of the Star Wars prelude trilogy where we are shown quite powerfully through the birth of Darth Vader how knowing future information (sometimes without knowing the larger picture) can literally be destructive.

It is demonstrated well how words can be so meaningless with the older woman interested in buying a shelter. She was by far the most well written and compelling character in the episode.


"It's the words. 'It's going to be ok'. That's what they told us, and look what happened."


If anything in this episode can be considered annoying it should be Sam's insensitivity to the point of view of the Ellroys. He pushed, the Ellroys rightfully pulled.

I'll admit one thing that still annoyed me about the Ellroys was the little girl accusing Sam of calling the father a liar but now that stands out as likely being just because I have a tendency to be annoyed by the non-sensical upsets of little kids in general. When my younger cousin was that age her upsets would get identical reactions from me, a lot of the times even aloud (like I said, I have a raw honesty but have only in the past few years been learning to refrain from responding at all if it wouldn't be considered appropriate). So I don't hold that against the show.

So overall I've come to see this as being a good episode.
__________________

-=-=-=-=-
Icon made by the lovely Ladystoneheart with the beautiful screen captures of StrayStar.
Signature made by me.
My QL screen capture collection: http://s1366.photobucket.com/user/Sa...?sort=3&page=1
Sam Beckett Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2000 - 2016 Al's Place Quantum Leap Fan Site | 4.8.15.16.23.42